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MusicMetalHead

I am a twenty two year old dude from Wisconsin, U.S.A.
This is my reference blog where I post art related things. You will find lots of helpful tutorials here, along with concept art and anything I find inspirational.


My Junk blog for all of the things I like but that aren't always art related or particularly helpful. Junk Blog

Art Blog two
Jul 30 '14

darkchocolatecreature:

FOR ALL MY SISTAS HAVING TROUBLE FINDING THE RIGHT SHADE OF FOUNDATION/CONCEALER, THE KEY IS TO KNOW YOUR SKIN TONE AND UNDERTONE. HOPE THIS HELPS :)

More info on artbecomesyou.com

Jul 30 '14

conceptcookie:

Tutorial: Choosing Interesting Colors by PurpleKecleon

Watch Mel Herring’s (PurpleKecleon) full tutorial on choosing interesting colors HERE. She takes you through her entire process of this piece while talking about how to choose colors to create harmony in your piece!

Jul 30 '14

conceptcookie:

The getting Started Course is here, go check it out here: http://cgcookie.com/concept/cgc-courses/getting-started-in-digital-art/

Jul 30 '14

thesilvereye:

View the fullsize tutorial on DA | The most handy hair structure tutorials are this video by Proko and thisblog post.These are useful for thinking about the direction hair locks flow with different styles: 1 2 3 4 5 | Painting Realistic Hair | Shading with gradients: 1 2 | Tutorials by me including: Gimp Brush Dynamics, Coloring Eyes and Coloring Method.

All example characters are fromThe Silver Eye webcomic!

Jul 29 '14

conceptcookie:

The 115 Citizen Hand Photos for References are up and ready for you guys to download! Check them out here:http://cgcookie.com/concept/2013/02/28/concept-cookie-resources-photo-references/

Jul 29 '14

amyreeder:

Here’s a little window into the colors as they develop!  Sadly I didn’t save any WIP versions of the rendering process.  I’ll try to remember that next time.

Because this piece was so unobvious I decided to flat out the overall shapes before I sent it out to my flatter Chris Canibano, so he could refine it all.  So the first image is me, the second is him.  I had him color hold a few things too…very important that the linework could be separated.  The third is what I did to adjust the flats to the color scheme I had in my head.

The fourth image is a huuuge jump, but yeah, I did my rendering, which involves a shading layer, some gradients, and some dodge tool highlights.  And I also, as you see, changed the background scheme a lot.  I wanted the background to look like the sun’s rays, but it needed to be dark enough for all the bright things to pop!  When I play around with color scheme, I select a few of the colors and mess with hue/saturation and slide the hue around to see if I get any ideas.  I also use the color mixer to sort of unify the colors…group them together, so to speak.  Picking colors is probably the most time-consuming part of coloring, and I don’t think I’m alone in this.

The last image is the final one; Here you can see what a difference all those effects make!  We’ve got glowing effects as well as a texture applied.  I don’t normally use textures on Rocket Girl…but again, I wanted this to seem like a depiction of buildings, not real buildings, so it was important to group and flatten everything to give it that effect.  I made the texture in Painter 9 with their watercolor brushes—I used this technique waaaaaay back when with that very first Madame Xanadu cover.  (I’ve tried the new Painter’s watercolors and it’s not nearly as good.  Thank goodness I still have an old computer with the program on it!)

Jul 29 '14

Art and Colouring Progress/Step-by-Step/Tutorial thingy :’)

nijuukoo:

Heeeey guys, so a lot of you have been asking about my colouring progress, and I’ve wanted to do something like it for a long time, so hopefully this will help! This is by no means the be-all end-all technique, this is just how I went through this drawing, but I still have much to learn. If you have a better or more efficient way to do something that i’ve done, don’t hesitate to share with me! Also, i’m not the greatest with explanations, but if you do need some clarification, leave me a message and I will try to re-explain anything that wasn’t clear c:

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I always start with force drawing. Drawing force means capturing the dynamic of an organic body with basic curves. Organic bodies are rarely ever straight. Even when we stand statically, we naturally sway our hips to the side, have more weight on one foot than the other, and our spines are never truly straight. When I first decided on a stance, I wanted my character to be slouching forward, so I sketched in where her head and how it’s facing, and then in one quick, natural stroke, drafted in the flow of her body, and her arms.

For a far more extensive look into drawing Force, you should definitely invest an hour into this 4 part tutorial here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=07fusT-dwVE I learned a lot from him, and it has made imagining and drafting poses much easier for me.

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When I was happy with the force, I began sketching in the limbs and fleshing out the body.

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when the sausage and ball limbs were in place, I fleshed it out even more and began roughing in details.

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Clean up time! On a separate layer, I traced the rough sketch with a 3 pt brush. Don’t forget to flip your canvas horizontally to find and fix any mistakes you couldn’t see normally!

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One of the biggest things that could help your line art look more dynamic is to include line weights. Line weights are important for depicting things like depth and really showing where objects collide. For this, I used a 4 pt brush, but had the tablet pressure control opacity imageon and lowered the flow to around 40-60%. Lines are darkest near creases, and around major details. Lines can be thinner/lighter for smaller details. You don’t need to draw in every detail right now; those can be added in later, after you’ve established a colour scheme, and when you’re closer to completion.

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Alright! now with the lines all done, I used the magic wand tool imageand selected the negative space (any part of the canvas that is NOT part of the subject). Don’t forget to magic wand the smaller areas too, like the area between her arm and her sketch pad. After all the negative space is selected I press ctrl+shift+i to invert the selection. I created a new folder/group (bottom of your layers tab, looks like a folder) and then with the group selected I pressed add layer mask (looks like a rectangle with a circle in the middle). That should give that new group a mask that looks something like this image. How a mask works is that any part of the mask that is black will be transparent while any part of the white will be visible. Therefore, with this mask set to this group folder (which will hold all your colour layers) you won’t have to worry about colouring anywhere outside the lines as long as those layers are inside that group with the mask. Of course, this won’t be perfect, you can clean up/fix a mask by selecting the mask and using a black or white brush to colour in any erroneous area. Best way to see how your mask looks is to fill in the background layer with a darker colour.

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Next, I added the shade layer. I use the Hard Round Pressure Opacity brush with the tablet pressure control opacity on and the flow lowered to around 10-30%. I selected a mid grey tone and began shading in my character. The Hard Round Pressure Opacity brush is not pen pressure sensitive by default in regards to brush size (i.e. the colour will be lighter if your penstroke is light, but the size will remain the same regardless of how light/hard you press your pen); to manually turn on pen pressure, click the tablet pressure control size button image.

Remember to use different shades of grey (lol fifty shades of grey) because shadows aren’t simply one shade. You can also use the burn tool imageto darken some areas of the shadows.

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I turned off the shade layer ‘cause i didn’t need it for the next step. I created a new layer and made that my colour layer. On this layer I’m basically filling in all the base colours for my character. If you haven’t yet established a colour scheme, you can always make multiple colour layers for specific areas of the drawing and then tweak it using the Image > Adjustments Hue and Saturation option window.

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When I was happy with the colours, I turned the shade layer back on and changed the layer mode to Multiply. Because my shadow layer is grey, the resulting image looks like this. It looks a bit cold, and a bit boring, so what I do is add colour to the shadow layer. There are two ways to do this: select your shadow layer and go image > adjustments > colour balance, or select your layer and create adjustment layer (bottom of your layers tab, looks like a circle half black half grey). Creating an adjustment layer will work the same as going to image > adjustments BUT instead of having that change permanent, you have the freedom of going back to those adjustments and changing them whenever you want by double clicking the adjustment layers.

When you create an adjustment layers, it will affect EVERY LAYER BENEATH IT, so in order to keep the adjustment layer affecting ONLY the shadow layer, select the adjustment layer and press ctrl + alt + g. there should then be an arrow which then indicates that it is only affecting the single layer beneath it.

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Here’s what the image looks like now with the shadow layer having a redder hue. Looks much warmer and more natural.

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For this art style, the colours and colour blending is what I wanted to show off, rather than relying on the line art for details. So, on a new layer ABOVE the line art layer, I used a brush with the pressure opacity on and the flow around 20-50% and started adding in colour details like the hair, the knots in the purse, fur on the boots, etc. etc.

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I personally found the best way to do this is to use the eyedropper tool (or press and hold alt when you have the brush tool in use) and selecting adjacent colours in order to do the colour blending.

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I kept drawing in details on until I was happy 8)

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Almost done! for an extra little boost of lighting, I duplicated all the layers  (except the background layer) and merged those copies into one layer. ctrl + press the layer to select the positive area of that layer (i.e. anything with a non-transparent pixel, which would be your image) and create a new layer with a layer mask applied to it. On that new layer, I changed the blending mode to soft light and selected a pale yellow colour. Using a large sized soft edged brush, I lightly coloured in certain areas that would be highlighted.

Bam. Voila, and it’s done! Sorry for stretching your dash to the ends of the earth, but I hope this has been helpful to you c: Happy drawing \o/ ♥!!

Jul 29 '14

helpfulharrie:

This is a spiritual sequel to Thoughts on Wings by uzlo, which is also on tumblr.

Anyway, while reading the tags and comments on said tutorial, I noticed a lot of people expressing a desire for a bat wing version. So here’s a little guide I whipped up on them!

Bat wings are simpler than bird wings in that there’s no feather structure to learn, but you do need to learn the bones. Once you get the hang of those though, they’re pretty easy!

Bat photos are all kinda same-y to be honest (likely due to them mostly being nocturnal), and don’t do a good job of showing how those babies work. So, slowmotion videos are really helpful!

Jul 28 '14

actorswithactionfigures:

marvelandspiderman:

Well if this isn’t just the cutest

~Peter

Don’t think I’ve ever blogged the whole comic, in its entire adorableness…

You’re welcome :)

A-Babies VS. X-Babies. Written by Skottie Young. Art by Gurihiru.

Jul 28 '14

amyreeder:

Here’s the penciling/inking process of the cover!

First, I can never draw the same thing well twice, and I plan better small, so I take that little thumbnail you saw earlier and I blow it up to the size I want to draw it at, and tape it to the board, and lightbox the image.

I do this in chunks instead penciling it all and inking it all…I find I can go way more complex that way, and it’s cleaner, and it gives me less of a headache because I can concentrate on one thing at a time.

This was a tough image to draw, mostly because I was drawing a bunch of famous buildings and it’s always hard to figure out how to get to that level of it being recognizable, without going overboard.

And in this particular drawing, I wanted the buildings to seem like depictions and to feel very flat. These days that’s really hard for me to do, because I’ve gone so many years trying to train myself not to do that.

But here, it’s supposed to be an illustration within an illustration…the buildings are like the sun’s rays, but more a depiction of the sun’s rays, much like either art deco or a really religious painting.

I’m learning that it’s a good way to go, to draw lots of little windows by just drawing stripes one way, and then going over it with a white gel pen the other way. This time I was crunched for time, so I did the white stripes digitally.

Tomorrow: colors!

Jul 28 '14

Shading and art books

kasiaslupecka:

Reply and learning time! :)

I got a question how to learn shading . I think some of You like to learn more about this topic. I will write down what is my approach to shading.

Remember this picture. It’s the most basic behavior of light on the object.

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We have shadow when light interacts with an object.

We have different objects in life. Every complex object (like human body) can be drawn as a sum of very simple objects. The basic objects are : Sphere, cylinder, cube and cone.

First exercise is to learn how the light interacts with the basic objects: cube, cylinder, sphere and cone.

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Now You have first practice finished. You understand relationship object-light.

Next exercise is to find object You want to draw and try to find the basic objects. In this example let it be human form.

Let’s see how Glenn Vilppu done that. (he’s doing online workshops!)

Some example of his drawings:

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Can You see the basic shapes in human body? And how it helps with the lightning?

Art books I recommend.

If You want general art knowledge that can be used in every drawing You do the absolutely best books are Andrew Loomis. He covers everything - from the human body, perspective to composition. Everyone can profit from reading his books. Seriously - go grab them now!

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To complete this collection You must have the book Color and Light by James Gurney. Knowledge in this book is essential if You want to work with color, light, traditional or digital. No matter what medium.

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I hope I helped a little! Wish You all successful drawings! :)

Jul 28 '14

ryanlangdraws:

I’ve had people insist that I used 3d an photos, despite my assertion that I haven’t. You can see the thread here http://www.reddit.com/r/comicbooks/comments/2ag3ku/this_is_a_painting_iron_man_by_ryan_lang/ But this isn’t for them. This is for people that like to see the process of an illustration. I tried to break it down, but if there are any questions, please ask. I have no problem with artists using photos or 3d in their digital work, so when I say I didn’t use photos or 3d for this image, it was that I wanted to see what I could accomplish on my own (with a couple of filters at the end). And if after this process post people still refuse to believe that I didn’t use photos or 3d….. I will take that as a compliment.

Jul 27 '14
Jul 27 '14
Jul 27 '14